These Are The Side Effects Of Ginger

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Ginger is among the healthiest (and most delicious) spices on the planet.

It is loaded with nutrients and bioactive compounds that have powerful benefits for your body and brain.

Ginger has been shown to be effective against exercise-induced muscle pain.

In one study, consuming 2 grams of ginger per day, for 11 days, significantly reduced muscle pain in people performing elbow exercises.

Ginger does not have an immediate impact, but may be effective at reducing the day-to-day progression of muscle pain. These effects are believed to be mediated by the anti-inflammatory properties.

Ginger is a great ideal for treating cold and flu-like symptoms. This spice can make your body warmer and reduce the cold symptoms. I always keep some fresh ginger in a fridge in case I got a cold suddenly. Ginger also gets on well with lemon, honey, and mint leaves. And here the way I usually make a ginger honey drink when I got a cold.

All you need is 2 gram of fresh ginger and honey. You can press or chop ginger into small pieces. But with me, I prefer pressing ginger more than cutting it into small pieces. By pressing ginger we can take more water and nutrient from ginger than cutting. After that, you can put pressed ginger or cut ginger into a cup with 1 or 2 tsp. of honey. Depend on your taste, you can put more or reduce the honey. Pour 150-200 ml of fresh boiling water over it. Wait for 5 -7 minutes you can enjoy your ginger honey tea.

 

But consuming ginger may have its side effects:

Side effects of ginger include:

  • increased bleeding tendency
  • abdominal discomfort
  • cardiac arrhythmias (if overdosed)
  • central nervous system depression (if overdosed)
  • dermatitis (with topical use)
  • diarrhea
  • heartburn
  • mouth or throat irritation.

 

  • Ginger may lower blood sugar levels. Using significant amounts of Ginger may result in a need to adjust diabetes medication. These medications include chlorpropamide (Diabinese), glimepiride (Amaryl), glipizide (Glucotrol), glyburide (DiaBeta, Glynase PresTab, Micronase), insulin, pioglitazone (Actos), rosiglitazone (Avandia), tolbutamide (Orinase), and others.

 

 

  • Ginger may interfere with blood clotting and prolong bleeding time like Chamomile. There is a risk of serious bleeding if a person takes blood-thinning medications such as warfarin or medicine which can reduce the level of platelets (blood cells that help the blood to clot) or interfere with platelet function. So do not take ginger if you have the bleeding disorder or using blood-thinning medication and even aspirin. Make sure to tell your doctor if you are taking ginger before surgery or being placed under anesthesia for any reason.

 

  • Don’t use ginger with children under 2-year-olds. Children over 2 may take ginger to treat nausea, stomach cramping, and headaches. But you should ask your doctor to help you find the right dose for the children.

 

  • The use of ginger during pregnancy is hotly debated among doctors and researchers. Ginger’s reputation as a natural anti-nauseant makes it an appealing choice for expectant mothers who experience morning sickness, and MedlinePlus reports that taking ginger doesn’t seem to affect the rate of fetal malformations. Ginger’s anti-coagulant properties, however, can increase the risk of bleeding, making it riskier as you near your due date. Never take ginger during pregnancy without speaking with your doctor first.